abc, food truck marketing, food truck rental

Food trucks for rent near you: Experiential Food Truck Rental

Let’s take three things as givens about food trucks. They’re still wildly popular with consumers; many prospective truck operators don’t have the money or credit rating they need to get into the game; and some food truck owners are looking for ways to derive more income from their truck than they currently do. No wonder website http://www.experientialfoodtruckrental.com, seems like it could catch on.

The site, self-described as a platform to connect truck owners with truck renters, is nothing fancy. It works this way. First, truck owners post a profile of the fully equipped and permitted truck they have for rent; then interested truck renters search profiles by zip code or description. From there, it’s up to the owner and potential renter to hammer out the details.

The service is free to potential renters. Experientialfoodtruckrental.com makes money by charging truck owners to post their vehicle’s information on the site. It’s not much: $9.95 per month or $99 per year, cancelable at any time.

This could be an idea whose time has come.  Food trucks are already acknowledged as the most affordable way to break into the restaurant business. We’re sure plenty of people who have been dreaming the food truck dream will be frequent visitors to the experientialfoodtruckrentl.com site.

On Fox's

On Fox’s “MasterChef,” host Gordon Ramsay drove one of three rented food trucks on-air. (Photo: Fox).

There might also be an untapped market to be found among short-term renters who need access to a food truck for a just a few special events each year. Anyone who’s been the volunteer food coordinator for a youth soccer tournament, charity 5k run, local art festival or similar one-shot outdoor event will be eager to explore the food truck rental opportunities listed on this site.

Owners of brick and mortar restaurants are potential renters, too. Some current operators might rent a truck from time to time to cherry-pick lucrative events. Others could experiment with whether having a food truck is a good way to boost revenue and extend their restaurant’s brand before going all in by purchasing one. A few might consider renting a truck to test-market a new restaurant idea, using it as an inexpensive method to establish proof of concept.

Why would current food truck owners rent out their valuable truck to strangers? The site answers that question this way: “To make money. This is business. Truck rentals range from $100/day to $1000/day. So, if you rent your truck out for just one day all year, you can cover your minimal listing cost here and make money. If you rent for longer, it’s a no-brainer.”

The actual mechanics of the rental are handled between the parties involved. For $199, experientialfoodtruckrental.com can provide a sample rental agreement and checklist that will guide renters and owners through the process.

Plenty of food trucks have been rented to date, both short- and long-term. High-profile renters have included ESPN (to promote World Cup soccer viewing); the Food Network (all eight trucks used on the “Great Food Truck Race” show were rentals); Microsoft (it rented four trucks to publicize its Windows-based mobile phones); Frito Lay (to promote Doritos); and Fox television (three trucks rented for an episode of “MasterChef,” one of them “driven on-air by Gordon Ramsay” for what that’s worth).

We don’t know if experientialfoodtruckrental.com will work as advertised. But we’re hoping it does, because we can see how it could open doors to new business opportunities for entrepreneurial-minded restaurant operators and for those who aspire to become one.

Experientialfoodtruckrentalblog

Beyond Content

Brands turn to food truck promotions and marketing to build trust and relationships with consumers “Food Truck Custom marketing”

With many food truck rental companies on the internet, how do you find the best one for you promotion? You need the best in the industry Food Truck Custom Marketing. With the help from our promotional mobile vehicle rental experts, we will make it easier to than before to utilize promotional mobile vehicles for your next promotions’ marketing campaign.

Los Angeles CA, December, 31,2014 and January 01, 2015

Food Truck Custom Marketing.  Just ended a two-day tailgate party at the Pasadena Rose Bowl, We handed out turkey legs to promote the ABC show Galavants, ABC turned to a the only food truck marketing company in the USA, the food truck marketing experts, Food Truck Custom Marketing.

abc truck 2

This street promotions and marketing tactic, attracts an audience of all ages to the…

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Using Advanced Tech to Measure Customer Experience

Companies that can differentiate themselves will be the ones that can derive value and drive customer engagement based on data analysis of emotional responses. – using-advanced-tech-to-measure-customer-experience.

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By Krishnan Ramanujam

Think for a moment of the last time you shared a negative experience on your social channels, or when you conducted research from your mobile device before making a purchase in a store. More likely than not, these actions are second nature to you as they are for most consumers who consider multiple personalized touch points with a brand or product—including online, social, mobile, in store, etc.—to be the norm.

And it is.

However, for businesses, regardless of industry, this shift in customer communications is transformational. It is compelling companies to redefine traditional business and customer experience (CX) strategies in order to enable faster scaling, real-time engagement, and new innovation models that will retain and build customer loyalty.

 

The key is to identify what makes each individual consumer tick by understanding their personal experience, feedback and preferences, and then standardizing that experience across all touch points to meet that customer’s expectations. It may sound like a daunting task, but, in many ways, the hard work has been done. Consumers are already talking with brands; it’s just a matter of listening to what they say.

Today’s customers are providing businesses with a treasure trove of rich, real-time data, and the latent power of that information is immense. It should be used to inform business strategies and, more importantly, is an opportunity for companies to make educated deductions about how their customers’ needs will evolve in the future so that they can plan accordingly and improve customer retention.

The data that companies are mining is not just objective or transactional. It is emotional and includes highly subjective opinions from customers who are expressing either satisfaction or dissatisfaction with their experience with a company or product. This subjective and emotional feedback is the most critical for companies to note.

In fact, our customers have told us that the “voice of the customer” is ranked highly as both a short- and long-term priority for their businesses because it affects key business goals, including customer retention and revenue growth. It will become even more important in the coming years as brands compete for customer loyalty in an increasingly crowded market. The companies that are able to differentiate themselves will be the ones that are able to derive value and drive customer engagement based on data analysis of both subjective and emotional responses.

In order to do this effectively, companies must first strengthen and refine existing data-mining efforts. Here are two guidelines for achieving that:

· Ensure that the back office is fully integrated with the front office (or the consumer touch-points and interfaces) to provide a seamless customer experience.

· Standardize all data being collected in order to translate subjective (emotional) data to objective (actionable) information.

With these tasks accomplished, a brand can then identify the CX pain points it needs to address. Businesses can leverage this data to predict future responses to situations, products or services, and through sophisticated and automated analysis, can identify ways to deliver improved solutions for their customers.

For example, in the commercial banking sector, customers are faced with a variety of options and opportunities. Banks must aggressively differentiate themselves, and many are adopting CX programs that focus on driving customer loyalty.

Consider this client, a global retail and private bank that wanted to change the overall customer expectation of banking for its more than eight million customers serviced via an extensive branch network, online channels and customer call centers. The bank acknowledged the pressing need to develop a CX strategy that was capable of monitoring the conversations currently occurring, evaluating customer feedback and opinion, and standardizing experiences across platforms and geographies.

By tapping into the advanced technology tools available to them, this global bank created a 360-degree view of the customer that was focused on not only acquiring and engaging new customers, but also on activating, sustaining and retaining existing customers. The bank created a repository of all customer data, which was then mined to create personalized offers and recommendations saved to a customer portal that was available to all bank employees.

This approach ensured that regardless of the point of contact, customers would get the same level of service and receive a consistent message that was tailored specifically to them. The result was an enhanced customer experience, which drove loyalty for the bank’s brand.

This is just one example of how companies can harness the power of technology in order to build customer loyalty through personalized experiences. Looking ahead, it will be increasingly important for companies, regardless of who their customers are, to tap into this data to stay ahead of the competition. When done correctly, the value of a personalized, data-driven approach to customer engagement is immeasurable.

See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/crm/using-advanced-tech-to-measure-customer-experience.

 

 

 

 

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Hispanic Events: Gain Critical Mass through Large Scale Hispanic Events

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Pitbull Takes the Stage at Calle Ocho in Miami

Large scale Hispanic events like Calle Ocho and Fiesta Broadway have been a mainstay for many marketers trying to reach the lucrative U.S. Hispanic market. The hope for brands participating in these large scale events is that they will create a brand connection with the 1 million + attendees which they can translate into sales. The reality – many brands get lost in the clutter of brands participating in the event and the planned activation of  a spinwheel, free samples and coupons does little to nothing to drive sales or create a lasting brand impression. Thus, brand managers are challenged to justify the ROI and often times the Hispanic program is deemed a failure.

We believe it is possible to gain critical mass through large scale Hispanic events. Here are three considerations to help drive a successful Hispanic event strategy.

1. Integrate Hispanic Event Efforts into Your Total Marketing Plan
Your consumers don’t live in a Hispanic-only world and neither should your event efforts. Leverage the marketing strength of your total brand efforts to enrich the consumer experience. For example, sponsoring the NBA this year? Did you know that Hispanics comprise sixteen percent of the league’s fan base? Knowing that, elevate your event experience! Create an “NBA experience” with a Hispanic twist – highlight Hispanic players and tell their stories or invite local Hispanic artists to use backboards as a canvas to create a one-of-a-kind gallery. Promote this Hispanic outreach through your total market media and social media channels.

2. Remember Content is King

It’s true that Hispanics were “the original” social network long before Facebook was invented. And with the advent of social media and the proliferation of smart phones among Hispanics, these tech savvy consumers are actively looking for those “shareworthy” moments. So give them something to talk about at your event experience! A banner becomes a step & repeat photo opportunity. Turn your brand iconography into larger-than-life art installations. And use relevant event and brand hashtags to encourage, track and participate in the conversation.

3. Nobody Likes a One Night Stand.

No matter how big and spectacular the event may be, one event does not make a Hispanic marketing plan. Look for opportunities to extend the conversation and/or event association long after the “circus has left town”. Create a database from your event attendees and schedule on-going communication with them. Thank them for visiting your event area, invite them to take a survey, surprise them with a tweet or better yet, a surprised product gift! Remind them what makes this event so amazing and how grateful you are to share in that experience with them. Better yet, invite them to your next event, be it a Hispanic targeted or total market effort!

There are some incredible large scale Hispanic events across the country that can be leveraged to meet your marketing goals – Calle Ocho in Miami, Fiesta Broadway in LA, Fiesta San Antonio, Fiesta del Sol in Chicago and the Puerto Rican Day Parade in New York to name a few. Do your events have the right elements to create critical mass for your brands?

 

 

For more information:

sales@experientialfoodtruckrental.com

 

 

 

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Experiential Marketing Trends 2014

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Experiential marketing is about connecting consumers with brands through live face to face experiences, creating personal and relevant memories.  With consumers bombarded by traditional advertising and becoming more likely to listen to ‘non-stop music’ radio stations, watch ‘on demand’ TV and flick past print adverts, 2013 proved to be a blossoming year for experiential marketing.

For what used to be an afterthought, experiential marketing is swiftly becoming a key tactic in many advertising campaigns.  Budget’s increased by 7.6% in 2013 vs. economic growth of 1.6%, and it’s predicted to skyrocket even further in 2014.

To help you see the big picture, we’ve put together what to expect in 2014:

Trend #1: Big Data vs. Real Data

Experiential marketing is about real conversations and meaningful impressions you can count. On the surface, it looks like experiential produces smaller numbers, but experiential is about quality over quantity, and they’re authentic numbers.

Half a million people could read a newspaper, but does that mean half a million people read the advert inside? No. Traditional has a larger potential reach but experiential gives a realistic impression count based on direct engagements.

With that said, in 2014, these smaller numbers won’t cut it and there’ll likely be an emphasis on increasing them.

Can we achieve this by quickening quality engagements from 60 seconds to 30 seconds? Perhaps. Expectations in the experiential realm are rising and it’s our job as experiential marketers to face this challenge in the upcoming year.

Trend #2: Gen Y Will Continue to Demand Experiential

It’s estimated that Gen Y’s consumer spending will top over 100-billion dollars next year, and as a result, they are a huge target for brands. But they’re finicky. They’ve seen it all, they live in the moment and they’re far more impulsive than any other age group.

But this is good news for the experiential industry. A new stat says 78% of millennials are more inclined to become part of a brand if they have that face-to-face interaction.

This is where a greater emphasis on experiential as a primary (and necessary) marketing tactic comes into play. Gen Y demands it.

Trend #3: Increased Experiential Integration

In 2014 we will see more experiential and PR companies collaborating to create awareness—especially with the evolution of technology and social media. Experiential companies will longer be invited to the party, they are organizing the party.  The Magnum pop-up shop integrated these two strategies superbly in Bloor-Yorkville this summer.

Trend #4: Experiential Will Become a New Form of Market Research

Judging from our own experiences and the way the industry is progressing, we believe experiential marketing will become a new form of market research in 2014.

With the consumer right in front of your brand ambassadors, it’s easy to gather more information in the midst of engagement.  It’s live.  It’s quick. And it goes a long way towards further understanding consumer behavior.

For example, we worked with a company in October distributing promotional materials and talking about their services. Not only did we create meaningful relationships with their target market, but we also conducted a quick survey collating customer impressions of the brand.  Because of the one-on-one interaction, people were more than willing to answer.  It felt normal and natural, and it was easy to get honest information and feedback about both the brand and its programs.

One of the strongest reasons why we think this will be a key trend for 2014 is because leveraging brand ambassadors to collect data in the midst of an existing experiential campaign is a valuable add, and incredibly affordable in comparison to traditional research methods.

Experiential creates so many different opportunities for live market research and we expect to see this grow to a higher level next year.

Trend #5 Evolving Experiential Technology

At the beginning of 2012, we thought using brand ambassadors using iPads was a big deal. By 2013 it was routine.

We still love our iPads (of course!) but we’ve embraced other technological resources, like the use of green screens for fun photo shoots and videos, and social technology for campaign integration.

The increase in marketing function integration will rely on using the right technology. And as new technology evolves, exciting and innovative experiential opportunities will follow suit

Trend #6 Experiential Marketing Will Consolidate Its Identity

Moving into the New Year, it’s important to note that experiential will continue to grow into its own identity.  Forget all the trend words—Buzz marketing, engagement marketing, impact marketing—experiential marketing is the terminology marketing will adopt in 2014.

But this kind of consolidation only happens when experiential itself finally becomes recognized as the most effective and affordable tactic on a person-to-person level out there and this recognition is reflected in experiential’s share of marketing dollar allocation.

We already saw gains in 2013 with larger brands acknowledging that experiential stretches their marketing dollar and gets tangible (and relevant) results.

Original Post by Calum McGuigan

For more information:

sales@experientialfoodtruckrental.com

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How to combine content creation, sponsorship and experiential marketing to impact your bottom line.

For many years, creating content meant making a TV spot

 

These days anyone can create content, but not all content is worth creating.

As the cloud gets cloudier, companies are challenged to rise above the turbulence of advertising and online chatter to reach the sunny calm where brands, media, influencers, and consumers work together to create meaning, value, and connection.

 

I’ll be interested, if you’ll be interesting

 

As brands such as Red Bull, Levis, Absolut, Coca Cola, Harley Davidson, etc. have successfully shown, the best way to market any good, service, brand or place is by providing experiences and content that is so engaging, consumers and the media can’t help but pay attention.

Move successfully past the content marketing mainstream and combine the three hottest marketing trends:

 

Content Creation

Experiential Marketing

Sponsorship

 

Content

According to a 2011 study by the Content Marketing Institute, content marketing is one of the top-growing fields with an increasing number of marketers relying on content strategy for overall success.

The objectives of content strategy are:

Brand awareness – 69%

Customer acquisition – 68%

Lead generation – 67%

Customer retention/loyalty – 62%

 

Content Marketing Institute, 2011

 

Experiential

Asked “How important is a previous unique experience when deciding what specific brands you use in the future?”, over 62% said a unique brand experience was very important; only 1% disagreed.

“Best Experience Brands”, global study by Jack Morton Worldwide, 2011

 

Experiential

In a study, 85% of respondents said that participating in experiential marketing would cause them to talk about a product or brand and 1 in 4 marketing executives believe that event marketing provides the best return on investment EventView, 2006

 

Sponsorship

Sponsorship is the fastest growing form of marketing according to the International Events Group (IEG), which is projecting a significant sponsorship spending growth (4.8%) for 2013, even in the face of overall economic volatility.

“International event Partnerships, Sponsorship and Fundraising”, by Nadia Laice,

 

Sponsorship

And it pays off for the brands. Corporations that consistently invested in sponsorship outperformed market averages and those who spent at an above average level outperformed those who spent at a below average level.

“Does sponsorship pay off? An examination of the relationship between investment in sponsorship and business performance” International Journal of Sport Marketing & Sponsorship

 

69% of Canadians said they would prefer to do business with a brand that supports their favorite causes Today’s consumers are interested in a brand’s values. They’re looking for brands with a conscience, brands that are good citizens who support the community in a fun and engaging way. 69% of Canadians said they would prefer to do business with a brand that supports their favorite causes, 53% said the same for arts / cultural events. Interestingly, Canada is the only nation in the world where sports do not account for the greatest number of proposal requests or allocations. The number one sector in Canada is fairs, festivals and exhibitions, followed by the arts at number two “Consumer Sponsorship Rankings”, Partnership Group, 2012

 

What to do?

Brands have to create emotional content that tells a story to impact consumers’ behaviors, attitudes, or perceptions of their brand in a positive way – content that is not about the product and not a sales pitch.

Content that is driven by shared values and a vision to make the world a better place. Content that engages all five senses. Content that asks questions instead of promoting products. Content that enables communication, stimulates discussion and brings people together. Content the consumer identifies with and wants to share with friends.

 

 

Cultural content – value promotion at its best All this can be achieved in one fell sweep: Developing custom-made, brand-owned, cultural content and cultural events. Putting the logo of your brand on the catalogue of an exhibition or show is a step in the right direction but doesn’t compare to the impact of developing and owning content or an event.

 

Culture?

In this context “culture” is defined as an inclusive concept, encompassing not just fine arts, but design, crafts, sports, leisure, community-oriented projects and even cause-driven events. In short: content and experiences that elevate the human spirit and bring people together.

 

The content matrix

 

The content you develop engages your audience in various dimensions. For the purpose of this article, we’ll focus on only two.

 

Immersion

 

Product/Service Value

Related driven

Absorption

 

The first (horizontal) dimension has product/service related content—that is to say the informative, instructional rational kind—on one side of the equation; and value driven—speaking to our emotions and triggering the hedonistic tendencies of the audience—on the other.

 

The second (vertical) dimension describes the level of engagement, necessary to experience the content. Absorption, on one end of the spectrum, describes the passive consumption of content, with a low level of engagement, addressing only 1 or 2 senses. Immersive content on the other side of the spectrum requires active participation, engages all five senses and takes the audience to a different world.

 

Content in the bottom left corner has the least potential to generate an emotional connection with your brand; e.g. product manual.

 

Content in the top right corner is the most interesting for your audience.

It immerses the participant, is not a sales pitch, and ideally engages all

5 senses. This kind of content has the most potential to create an emotional bond with your brand; e.g. Red Bull Music Academy

 

Examples

 

6 simple steps

Let’s look at the necessary steps to develop engaging cultural content for your brand

 

Step 1

Branding 101 – What are your values? Who are your customers?

 

Anything you do should be based on, and guided by, your vision and values and an in-depth knowledge of your customers. If you’re an urban brand that promises adventure and excitement, and your customers are outgoing and fun loving, the content you develop is of course different from that developed by a luxury brand that promises its affluent clientele exclusivity.

Do your homework and get your story straight. You might also want to find out what your competitors are doing to avoid replicating their strategy.

 

Step 2

Think like a content developing agency

 

In the new market with a much more demanding and powerful consumer, you have to think like a content development agency to stay competitive. No matter if your revenue comes from selling a product or offering a service.

“Compelling content is the currency that buys your customer’s attention and affection long before they reach the stage of comparing features and benefits.”

 

Step 3

Define objectives and success metrics

 

Assess your situation, define objectives and develop success metrics. You want to be able to measure the level of success for your project. At the end of the project you want to be able to evaluate how successful it was and learn from the experience to keep improving your strategy.

Keep in mind that measuring outcome parameters and success metrics involves research, which requires resources – financial, human and otherwise. The costs attached to those resources should be included in the budget to avoid surprises and enable a sound post-event evaluation process.

 

Step 4

Develop ideas, based on your vision and values.

Now that you are aware of the content matrix, ask yourself what kind of content or event will be the most interesting for your audience. What will create the most opportunity to generate event-based secondary level content (photos, videos, catalogs, interviews, etc.) and will have the biggest potential to be shared, spread, talked about.

Keep a long-term strategy in mind. You want to be able to renew the experience and update the event/content over time to remain interesting and relevant in the eyes of your audience.

 

Step 5

Execute

Be diligent

Be professional

Have fun

 

Step 6

Post event evaluation and measuring ROI

 

If you have done your homework and defined objectives and success metrics as outlined in step 3, you are now ready to reap the fruits of your labor.

A post-event evaluation tells you how good you were and will help you to do a better job next time.

 

You will know how successful the project was and if you achieved your objectives.

You might get new insights from your audience, potentially impacting other areas of your marketing and communication efforts.

You will be able improve the project to increase reach and impact for the next one.

You will have the tools to convince key stakeholders to continue and expand your cultural content developments efforts.

 

 

By: Erik Hauser

 

For more information:

sales@experientialfoodtruckrental.com

 

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Millennials Are The Reason Food Trucks Will Continue To Grow

millennials

Millennials are those ages 19 to 34. Numerous studies are showing that they are buying fewer cars, houses, electronics, and credit cards. Why is this? Being the group hit the hardest by the economy, they have less money than their parents did at the same age. In fact, the average worth of someone from the age 29 to 37  has dropped 21% over the last 30 years. What does this mean for food truck owners owners?

Millennials are eating out less and less. This young generation is watching their wallet, and being more cautious about their spending. However, with this change in spending, also has come a change in what in desirable in food trucks. Millennials want the new, unique, and authentic. Not that this group isn’t eating out, it just means they want something that other generations really haven’t been as worried about.

So what exactly is this group of 80 million prospective customers looking for when deciding where to eat?

Variety and Customization

Millennials demand choices and the ability to personalize their order. Millennials expect variety, more choices, customization and their ability to be able to personalize their food experience.

History and Background

Millennials want some substance behind where they eat. They like to know the story about the places they eat, they think it’s key to feed one’s heart in addition to one’s stomach when going out. This is a place where food trucks can take take advantage by providing the history of how the mobile business came about to be what it is.

Ingredients

Quality ingredients are an absolute must for the this generation. Millennials believe that they deserve the best and will not settle for anything less. Millennials want to know and trust the food they receive in return for their money.

Socially Responsible 

Another new trend with this demographic is connecting with companies and businesses that are socially responsible and trustworthy. The bottom line is if they can’t trust you to take care of the world outside your mobile business, let alone your own workers, then they won’t trust you to serve quality food.

Generation Y is the most dominant demographic today. However, just making your name known won’t guarantee they’ll step up to your service window. As you can see, it takes a lot of factors to grab their attention and their business.

Are you and your food truck appealing to the Millennials? We hope so.

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