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Hispanic Events: Gain Critical Mass through Large Scale Hispanic Events

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Pitbull Takes the Stage at Calle Ocho in Miami

Large scale Hispanic events like Calle Ocho and Fiesta Broadway have been a mainstay for many marketers trying to reach the lucrative U.S. Hispanic market. The hope for brands participating in these large scale events is that they will create a brand connection with the 1 million + attendees which they can translate into sales. The reality – many brands get lost in the clutter of brands participating in the event and the planned activation of  a spinwheel, free samples and coupons does little to nothing to drive sales or create a lasting brand impression. Thus, brand managers are challenged to justify the ROI and often times the Hispanic program is deemed a failure.

We believe it is possible to gain critical mass through large scale Hispanic events. Here are three considerations to help drive a successful Hispanic event strategy.

1. Integrate Hispanic Event Efforts into Your Total Marketing Plan
Your consumers don’t live in a Hispanic-only world and neither should your event efforts. Leverage the marketing strength of your total brand efforts to enrich the consumer experience. For example, sponsoring the NBA this year? Did you know that Hispanics comprise sixteen percent of the league’s fan base? Knowing that, elevate your event experience! Create an “NBA experience” with a Hispanic twist – highlight Hispanic players and tell their stories or invite local Hispanic artists to use backboards as a canvas to create a one-of-a-kind gallery. Promote this Hispanic outreach through your total market media and social media channels.

2. Remember Content is King

It’s true that Hispanics were “the original” social network long before Facebook was invented. And with the advent of social media and the proliferation of smart phones among Hispanics, these tech savvy consumers are actively looking for those “shareworthy” moments. So give them something to talk about at your event experience! A banner becomes a step & repeat photo opportunity. Turn your brand iconography into larger-than-life art installations. And use relevant event and brand hashtags to encourage, track and participate in the conversation.

3. Nobody Likes a One Night Stand.

No matter how big and spectacular the event may be, one event does not make a Hispanic marketing plan. Look for opportunities to extend the conversation and/or event association long after the “circus has left town”. Create a database from your event attendees and schedule on-going communication with them. Thank them for visiting your event area, invite them to take a survey, surprise them with a tweet or better yet, a surprised product gift! Remind them what makes this event so amazing and how grateful you are to share in that experience with them. Better yet, invite them to your next event, be it a Hispanic targeted or total market effort!

There are some incredible large scale Hispanic events across the country that can be leveraged to meet your marketing goals – Calle Ocho in Miami, Fiesta Broadway in LA, Fiesta San Antonio, Fiesta del Sol in Chicago and the Puerto Rican Day Parade in New York to name a few. Do your events have the right elements to create critical mass for your brands?

 

 

For more information:

sales@experientialfoodtruckrental.com

 

 

 

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Experiential Marketing Trends 2014

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Experiential marketing is about connecting consumers with brands through live face to face experiences, creating personal and relevant memories.  With consumers bombarded by traditional advertising and becoming more likely to listen to ‘non-stop music’ radio stations, watch ‘on demand’ TV and flick past print adverts, 2013 proved to be a blossoming year for experiential marketing.

For what used to be an afterthought, experiential marketing is swiftly becoming a key tactic in many advertising campaigns.  Budget’s increased by 7.6% in 2013 vs. economic growth of 1.6%, and it’s predicted to skyrocket even further in 2014.

To help you see the big picture, we’ve put together what to expect in 2014:

Trend #1: Big Data vs. Real Data

Experiential marketing is about real conversations and meaningful impressions you can count. On the surface, it looks like experiential produces smaller numbers, but experiential is about quality over quantity, and they’re authentic numbers.

Half a million people could read a newspaper, but does that mean half a million people read the advert inside? No. Traditional has a larger potential reach but experiential gives a realistic impression count based on direct engagements.

With that said, in 2014, these smaller numbers won’t cut it and there’ll likely be an emphasis on increasing them.

Can we achieve this by quickening quality engagements from 60 seconds to 30 seconds? Perhaps. Expectations in the experiential realm are rising and it’s our job as experiential marketers to face this challenge in the upcoming year.

Trend #2: Gen Y Will Continue to Demand Experiential

It’s estimated that Gen Y’s consumer spending will top over 100-billion dollars next year, and as a result, they are a huge target for brands. But they’re finicky. They’ve seen it all, they live in the moment and they’re far more impulsive than any other age group.

But this is good news for the experiential industry. A new stat says 78% of millennials are more inclined to become part of a brand if they have that face-to-face interaction.

This is where a greater emphasis on experiential as a primary (and necessary) marketing tactic comes into play. Gen Y demands it.

Trend #3: Increased Experiential Integration

In 2014 we will see more experiential and PR companies collaborating to create awareness—especially with the evolution of technology and social media. Experiential companies will longer be invited to the party, they are organizing the party.  The Magnum pop-up shop integrated these two strategies superbly in Bloor-Yorkville this summer.

Trend #4: Experiential Will Become a New Form of Market Research

Judging from our own experiences and the way the industry is progressing, we believe experiential marketing will become a new form of market research in 2014.

With the consumer right in front of your brand ambassadors, it’s easy to gather more information in the midst of engagement.  It’s live.  It’s quick. And it goes a long way towards further understanding consumer behavior.

For example, we worked with a company in October distributing promotional materials and talking about their services. Not only did we create meaningful relationships with their target market, but we also conducted a quick survey collating customer impressions of the brand.  Because of the one-on-one interaction, people were more than willing to answer.  It felt normal and natural, and it was easy to get honest information and feedback about both the brand and its programs.

One of the strongest reasons why we think this will be a key trend for 2014 is because leveraging brand ambassadors to collect data in the midst of an existing experiential campaign is a valuable add, and incredibly affordable in comparison to traditional research methods.

Experiential creates so many different opportunities for live market research and we expect to see this grow to a higher level next year.

Trend #5 Evolving Experiential Technology

At the beginning of 2012, we thought using brand ambassadors using iPads was a big deal. By 2013 it was routine.

We still love our iPads (of course!) but we’ve embraced other technological resources, like the use of green screens for fun photo shoots and videos, and social technology for campaign integration.

The increase in marketing function integration will rely on using the right technology. And as new technology evolves, exciting and innovative experiential opportunities will follow suit

Trend #6 Experiential Marketing Will Consolidate Its Identity

Moving into the New Year, it’s important to note that experiential will continue to grow into its own identity.  Forget all the trend words—Buzz marketing, engagement marketing, impact marketing—experiential marketing is the terminology marketing will adopt in 2014.

But this kind of consolidation only happens when experiential itself finally becomes recognized as the most effective and affordable tactic on a person-to-person level out there and this recognition is reflected in experiential’s share of marketing dollar allocation.

We already saw gains in 2013 with larger brands acknowledging that experiential stretches their marketing dollar and gets tangible (and relevant) results.

Original Post by Calum McGuigan

For more information:

sales@experientialfoodtruckrental.com

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How to combine content creation, sponsorship and experiential marketing to impact your bottom line.

For many years, creating content meant making a TV spot

 

These days anyone can create content, but not all content is worth creating.

As the cloud gets cloudier, companies are challenged to rise above the turbulence of advertising and online chatter to reach the sunny calm where brands, media, influencers, and consumers work together to create meaning, value, and connection.

 

I’ll be interested, if you’ll be interesting

 

As brands such as Red Bull, Levis, Absolut, Coca Cola, Harley Davidson, etc. have successfully shown, the best way to market any good, service, brand or place is by providing experiences and content that is so engaging, consumers and the media can’t help but pay attention.

Move successfully past the content marketing mainstream and combine the three hottest marketing trends:

 

Content Creation

Experiential Marketing

Sponsorship

 

Content

According to a 2011 study by the Content Marketing Institute, content marketing is one of the top-growing fields with an increasing number of marketers relying on content strategy for overall success.

The objectives of content strategy are:

Brand awareness – 69%

Customer acquisition – 68%

Lead generation – 67%

Customer retention/loyalty – 62%

 

Content Marketing Institute, 2011

 

Experiential

Asked “How important is a previous unique experience when deciding what specific brands you use in the future?”, over 62% said a unique brand experience was very important; only 1% disagreed.

“Best Experience Brands”, global study by Jack Morton Worldwide, 2011

 

Experiential

In a study, 85% of respondents said that participating in experiential marketing would cause them to talk about a product or brand and 1 in 4 marketing executives believe that event marketing provides the best return on investment EventView, 2006

 

Sponsorship

Sponsorship is the fastest growing form of marketing according to the International Events Group (IEG), which is projecting a significant sponsorship spending growth (4.8%) for 2013, even in the face of overall economic volatility.

“International event Partnerships, Sponsorship and Fundraising”, by Nadia Laice,

 

Sponsorship

And it pays off for the brands. Corporations that consistently invested in sponsorship outperformed market averages and those who spent at an above average level outperformed those who spent at a below average level.

“Does sponsorship pay off? An examination of the relationship between investment in sponsorship and business performance” International Journal of Sport Marketing & Sponsorship

 

69% of Canadians said they would prefer to do business with a brand that supports their favorite causes Today’s consumers are interested in a brand’s values. They’re looking for brands with a conscience, brands that are good citizens who support the community in a fun and engaging way. 69% of Canadians said they would prefer to do business with a brand that supports their favorite causes, 53% said the same for arts / cultural events. Interestingly, Canada is the only nation in the world where sports do not account for the greatest number of proposal requests or allocations. The number one sector in Canada is fairs, festivals and exhibitions, followed by the arts at number two “Consumer Sponsorship Rankings”, Partnership Group, 2012

 

What to do?

Brands have to create emotional content that tells a story to impact consumers’ behaviors, attitudes, or perceptions of their brand in a positive way – content that is not about the product and not a sales pitch.

Content that is driven by shared values and a vision to make the world a better place. Content that engages all five senses. Content that asks questions instead of promoting products. Content that enables communication, stimulates discussion and brings people together. Content the consumer identifies with and wants to share with friends.

 

 

Cultural content – value promotion at its best All this can be achieved in one fell sweep: Developing custom-made, brand-owned, cultural content and cultural events. Putting the logo of your brand on the catalogue of an exhibition or show is a step in the right direction but doesn’t compare to the impact of developing and owning content or an event.

 

Culture?

In this context “culture” is defined as an inclusive concept, encompassing not just fine arts, but design, crafts, sports, leisure, community-oriented projects and even cause-driven events. In short: content and experiences that elevate the human spirit and bring people together.

 

The content matrix

 

The content you develop engages your audience in various dimensions. For the purpose of this article, we’ll focus on only two.

 

Immersion

 

Product/Service Value

Related driven

Absorption

 

The first (horizontal) dimension has product/service related content—that is to say the informative, instructional rational kind—on one side of the equation; and value driven—speaking to our emotions and triggering the hedonistic tendencies of the audience—on the other.

 

The second (vertical) dimension describes the level of engagement, necessary to experience the content. Absorption, on one end of the spectrum, describes the passive consumption of content, with a low level of engagement, addressing only 1 or 2 senses. Immersive content on the other side of the spectrum requires active participation, engages all five senses and takes the audience to a different world.

 

Content in the bottom left corner has the least potential to generate an emotional connection with your brand; e.g. product manual.

 

Content in the top right corner is the most interesting for your audience.

It immerses the participant, is not a sales pitch, and ideally engages all

5 senses. This kind of content has the most potential to create an emotional bond with your brand; e.g. Red Bull Music Academy

 

Examples

 

6 simple steps

Let’s look at the necessary steps to develop engaging cultural content for your brand

 

Step 1

Branding 101 – What are your values? Who are your customers?

 

Anything you do should be based on, and guided by, your vision and values and an in-depth knowledge of your customers. If you’re an urban brand that promises adventure and excitement, and your customers are outgoing and fun loving, the content you develop is of course different from that developed by a luxury brand that promises its affluent clientele exclusivity.

Do your homework and get your story straight. You might also want to find out what your competitors are doing to avoid replicating their strategy.

 

Step 2

Think like a content developing agency

 

In the new market with a much more demanding and powerful consumer, you have to think like a content development agency to stay competitive. No matter if your revenue comes from selling a product or offering a service.

“Compelling content is the currency that buys your customer’s attention and affection long before they reach the stage of comparing features and benefits.”

 

Step 3

Define objectives and success metrics

 

Assess your situation, define objectives and develop success metrics. You want to be able to measure the level of success for your project. At the end of the project you want to be able to evaluate how successful it was and learn from the experience to keep improving your strategy.

Keep in mind that measuring outcome parameters and success metrics involves research, which requires resources – financial, human and otherwise. The costs attached to those resources should be included in the budget to avoid surprises and enable a sound post-event evaluation process.

 

Step 4

Develop ideas, based on your vision and values.

Now that you are aware of the content matrix, ask yourself what kind of content or event will be the most interesting for your audience. What will create the most opportunity to generate event-based secondary level content (photos, videos, catalogs, interviews, etc.) and will have the biggest potential to be shared, spread, talked about.

Keep a long-term strategy in mind. You want to be able to renew the experience and update the event/content over time to remain interesting and relevant in the eyes of your audience.

 

Step 5

Execute

Be diligent

Be professional

Have fun

 

Step 6

Post event evaluation and measuring ROI

 

If you have done your homework and defined objectives and success metrics as outlined in step 3, you are now ready to reap the fruits of your labor.

A post-event evaluation tells you how good you were and will help you to do a better job next time.

 

You will know how successful the project was and if you achieved your objectives.

You might get new insights from your audience, potentially impacting other areas of your marketing and communication efforts.

You will be able improve the project to increase reach and impact for the next one.

You will have the tools to convince key stakeholders to continue and expand your cultural content developments efforts.

 

 

By: Erik Hauser

 

For more information:

sales@experientialfoodtruckrental.com

 

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Guerrilla Marketing Vs. Viral Marketing

Guerrilla marketing is the art and science of breaking conventional marketing rules, bypassing traditional outlets and using uncommon sense to reach people with marketing messages. Viral marketing can be loosely defined as digital word-of-mouth marketing. Both strategies can be more cost efficient than traditional techniques and can reach consumers in ways that connect with them in more personal and memorable ways. Understanding and applying these strategies in your marketing campaigns can provide distinct competitive advantages.

Guerilla Marketing

The term “guerrilla” comes from guerrilla warfare, in which soldiers use quick, unexpected attacks followed by fast retreats rather than fighting for prolonged periods out in the open. Like guerrilla warfare, guerrilla marketing messages appear seemingly out of nowhere, making a big impression on onlookers before quickly disappearing. This differs from traditional marketing tactics such as billboard or magazine advertising, which place messages in front of consumers for extended period in ways consumers have learned to tune out.

 

 

 

Viral Marketing

Viral marketing gets its name from the way in which physical viruses spread, which each individual unit replicating ceaselessly, creating exponential growth. A viral marketing campaign relies on social media sharing and other online word-of-mouth tactics to reach large numbers of people through their friends and contacts. A viral marketing campaign presents messages that consumers cannot resist sharing with their friends, who in turn share it with more people, fueling the cycle of exponential growth.

Examples

Flash-mobs are an example of a guerrilla marketing tactic. In a flash-mob, a large group of people infiltrates a public area, initially blending in with bystanders. Then the group acts out a skit or performs a song and dance to promote a marketing message to the surprise of everyone around. Mobile billboard trucks are another example of effective guerrilla marketing. Billboard trucks can display advertisements virtually anywhere, quickly moving on to cover different areas, even advertising right in front of competitors’ places of business.

Movie studios are providing numerous examples of successful viral campaigns, creating fake newscasts, websites and stories to generate buzz about future releases. Prior to the release of “The Dark Knight” in 2008, for example, Warner Brothers created a fake political campaign website for Harvey Dent, a character in the movie, providing fans with sharable campaign posters and other tools to spread the hype.

Tactics and Costs

Guerrilla marketing tactics cost a bit more than viral techniques in most instances. Guerrilla tactics can require more people, incurring higher labor costs, and can include the cost of physical media such as signs, vehicles and props. Viral campaigns, on the other hand, can be simple enough for a single person with a laptop and an Internet connection to produce. Viral campaigns truly level the playing field in terms of financial requirements, whereas guerrilla campaigns can be cost prohibitive to companies with smaller budgets.

Integrated Marketing Strategy

Integrated marketing strategies can be more effective than those that focus on a single set of tactics. Using guerrilla marketing techniques to create viral marketing campaigns can leverage the power of both of these innovative strategies at once. To create a guerrilla/viral marketing campaign, create a truly memorable and irresistibly sharable real-life component and turn that component into something sharable on the web. For example, rather than simply performing a flash-mob, consider filming the flash-mob and sharing it among your social media followers.

 

by David Ingram,

 

Just bring us your promotional vehicle idea big or small, and we will push the creative envelope as to what theses’ mobile vehicles can do. For many years food truck marketing have gone from a maybe afterthought, to an agencies clients overall marketing and promotions plan to literally a driving component in their marketing and promotions tours and campaigns. The mobility and creative ability to expand your clients marketing foot print lends itself to many marketing and promotions applications, with the recent national food truck craze the consumer is already intrigued with the food truck concept and are open to experience what theses food trucks and ice cream trucks can offer.

 

 

 

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Difference Between Traditional Marketing & Experiential Marketing

Marketing isn’t as simple as putting out a bunch of ads for your small business. Marketing plans require multiple tiers and approaches to achieve maximum effectiveness and to attract the most customers. Traditional and experiential marketing are two different schools of marketing thought; both are effective and can be used in conjunction with each other.

Traditional Marketing

Traditional marketing comprises those advertisements and promotions typically associated with marketing. Billboards, flyers, and television commercials are all examples of traditional marketing. These methods are effective in getting your name and your mission to the public, but attaining a personal touch is difficult through traditional marketing.

Experiential Marketing

As the name suggests, experiential marketing focuses on the experiences and the emotions of the customer. Experiential marketing allows customers to take ownership of a product’s marketing because they have an emotional investment in that product. Demonstrations and taste tests are common examples of experiential marketing; they draw customers to the product, give them a reason to remember the product and, hopefully, customers will give a good recommendation to their friends.

Traditional Vs. Experiential

The difference between traditional and experiential marketing may be considered a battle of old versus new philosophies, which is both true and untrue. Companies have used both traditional and experiential marketing for decades and will continue to do so in the future. However, as companies attempt to keep their costs down, experiential marketing is a more viable option. Instead of paying for a newspaper ad that is only useful for one day, a company can spend that same money to reach a group of customers that can market the product on the company’s behalf.

Traditional and Experiential Marketing Online

A good way for a small business to increase its profile is to use the Internet for both traditional and experiential marketing. Companies can do traditional marketing via e-mail mailing lists and banner ads while taking advantage of social media for experiential marketing. Using Facebook and Twitter can help people to get involved with your company and feel like they’re a part of your growing business. Furthermore, using social media is much cheaper than paying for traditional marketing conventions, allowing greater reach at a discounted price. However, experiential marketing through social media requires that you relinquish some control over your message, which conflicts with the tenets of traditional media, so factor this in as you consider your social media marketing endeavors.

 

by Bryan Berg,

 

 

For many years food truck marketing have gone from a maybe afterthought, to an agencies clients overall marketing and promotions plan to literally a driving component in their marketing and promotions tours and campaigns. The mobility and creative ability to expand your clients marketing foot print lends itself to many marketing and promotions applications, with the recent national food truck craze the consumer is already intrigued with the food truck concept and are open to experience what theses food trucks and ice cream trucks can offer.

 

 

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What Defined’s Experiential Marketing?

Consumers have dozens — in some cases, hundreds and even thousands — of choices when it comes to buying the products and services companies offer. The competitive nature of the marketplace means that marketers are under pressure to come up with highly effective campaigns and techniques. One option for marketers is experiential marketing.

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Definition

Experiential marketing is based on the entire experience a consumer has with a product or service. Whereas traditional marketing sells by pointing out benefits and features, experiential marketing focuses on allowing the consumer to try the service or product for himself. Experiential marketers control the environment in which this happens to some degree, but they want the consumer to make his own judgments about the product or service.

Rationale and Goal

The rationale behind experiential marketing is that consumers, regardless of what they’ve heard about a product or service, ultimately keep buying based on how they personally interact with whatever the company offers — that is, it is the experiences of the consumer that result in brand loyalty. The goal of experiential marketing thus is to appeal both to the rational and emotional sides people have so the consumer has a product or service experience that is truly memorable.

Features

Because experiential marketing is based on the experience consumers have, its main feature is that it engages multiple senses at the same time. For instance, if selling coffee, the marketer would draw the consumer’s attention not only to the taste of the beverage but to the way it looks and smells, its warmth and the pleasurable rush from the caffeine. Another feature is that it draws on the logic or sensory information the consumer has acquired or received previously. For example, in addition to pointing out the current taste, smell, warmth and rush from a cup of coffee, an experiential marketer also would help the consumer remember the past benefits received from being alert because of the caffeine and the happiness felt from enjoying a cup of coffee with family or friends.

Benefits

Because experiential marketing appeals to consumers on multiple levels, it can focus a consumer on a product or service quickly. Therefore, it is useful for current environments and social environments in which people demonstrate a shorter span of attention. If it is successful, the customers who respond end up being loyal to the company, which means the business has fairly stable revenue and profit and that customers will refer others.

Drawbacks

Experiential marketing is intended to engage as many senses and rationalization processes as possible. However, in reality, it is difficult to do this. For instance, a written coffee ad can show a person sipping coffee enjoying himself and include text about the flavor and aroma, but the consumer cannot actually taste and smell the coffee to see if he likes it. This means much of experiential marketing has to be hands-on and include one-on-one interaction, which dramatically reduces the number of people a marketer can reach at any given time. For instance, a marketer could hold a demonstration for a large group of 100 individuals, but a traditional TV ad could reach millions of viewers. It can cost a significant amount to use experiential marketing, as well, because the company has to provide samples or service hours free so the consumer can test what the company offers. Companies need to pay the people who do every demonstration.

 
by Wanda Thibodeaux,
Food Truck Custom Marketing, will provide your clients with a mobile brand experience that is sure to leave your clients engaged and satisfied. We offer everything from full wrapped food trucks, sampling truck, media trucks and ice cream trucks, or mobile kitchens. Just bring us your promotional vehicle idea big or small, and we will push the creative envelope as to what theses’ mobile vehicles can do.
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What is Experiential Marketing?

As a unique approach to the task of marketing goods and services, experiential marketing is a concept that integrates elements of emotions, logic, and general thought processes to connect with the consumer. The goal of experiential marketing is to establish the connection in such a way that the consumer responds to a product offering based on both emotional and rational response levels. Here are a few of the basics of experiential marketing, and how this process can often succeed when other marketing strategies fail.

Appealing to a variety of senses, experiential marketing seeks to tap into that special place within consumers that has to do with inspiring thoughts about comfort and pleasure, as well as inspiring a sense of practicality. This means that the marketer needs to have a firm grasp on the mindset of the target audience he or she wishes to attract. By understanding what the consumer is likely to think and feel, it is possible to get an idea of how to steer the customer in a direction that will relate with the product, and entice individuals to act on that impulse to purchase.

In order to engage in experiential marketing, it is necessary to engage as many of the senses as possible. Striking displays with powerful visual elements, such as websites, and visual media such as print ads should not only be visually appealing, but also conjure up daydreams of locales and reminders of sensations that are enjoyable to the individual. When used to create customer experiences of this nature, a sense of rapport between the product and the consumer is established that helps to make the good or service more desirable with each encounter.

Because experiential marketing connects with the consumer on multiple levels, the strategy is ideally suited for contemporary sales and marketing campaigns. Shortened attention spans demand that any ad campaign make a quick impression, or the opportunity to engage the consumer will quickly pass. While thirty second ads on radio and television once had a great impact, many people now use modern technology to avoid this sort of marketing approach.

This means that ads on the Internet, in print media, and on modern billboards must immediately catch the attention of prospective clients and hold that attention long enough to make an impact. Experiential marketing holds the key to making this happen. By appealing to all the senses, and making the connection quickly and seamlessly, this approach to the marketing task ensures that businesses can still attract and satisfy the needs and desires of consumers.
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